Legislation


AB 1162 – California

Status: Inactive / Dead
Year Introduced: 2021
Link: https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=202120220AB1162

Health care coverage: claims payments.
Existing law, the Knox-Keene Health Care Service Plan Act of 1975, provides for the licensure and regulation of health care service plans by the Department of Managed Health Care, and makes a willful violation of the act a crime. Existing law provides for the regulation of health insurers by the Department of Insurance. Existing law requires a health care service plan or health insurer to provide access to medically necessary health care services to its enrollees or insureds who have been displaced by a state of emergency. Existing law enumerates actions that a plan or insurer may be required to take to meet the needs of its enrollees or insureds during the state of emergency. Under existing law, the department may relax time limits for prior authorization during a state of emergency.
Existing law requires a health care service plan or a health insurer to reimburse each complete claim, as specified, as soon as practical, but no later than 30 working days, or for a health maintenance organization, 45 working days, after receipt of the complete claim. Under existing law, within 30 working days, or 45 working days for a health maintenance organization, after receipt of the claim, a plan or insurer can contest or deny a claim, as specified. Existing law also authorizes the plan or insurer to request reasonable additional information about a contested claim within 30 working days, or for a health maintenance organization, 45 working days. Existing law allows the plan or insurer 30 working days, or a health maintenance organization 45 working days, after receipt of the additional information to reconsider the claim. Under existing law, once the plan or insurer has received all the information necessary to determine payer liability for the claim and has not reimbursed the claim deemed to be payable within 30 working days, or 45 working days for a health maintenance organization, interest will accrue as specified.
Under existing law, for an unpaid claim for nonemergency services, the plan or insurer is required to pay interest, and a plan is required to automatically include the interest in its payment to the claimant on an uncontested claim that has not been paid within the prescribed period. Under existing law, if a plan fails to automatically include this interest owed, it is required to also pay the claimant a $10 fee for failing to comply with this requirement. Under existing law, if a claim for emergency services is not contested by the plan or insurer, and the plan or insurer fails to pay the claim within the 30- or 45-day respective period, the plan or insurer is required to pay a fee or interest, as specified.
This bill would require a health care service plan or health insurer to provide access to medically necessary health care services to its enrollees or insureds that are displaced or otherwise affected by a state of emergency. The bill would allow the department to also suspend requirements for prior authorization during a state of emergency.
The bill would shorten the time requirements for a plan or insurer to pay or contest a claim for emergency or nonemergency services to 20 working days. The bill would likewise shorten the time limit for requesting additional information about a claim to 20 working days. The bill would require a plan or insurer to pay a provider any interest and fees that accrue from failure to pay a claim regardless of whether the department institutes an enforcement action against the plan or insurer. The bill would define concurrent review for these purposes, and would authorize telephone, videochat, or onsite conduct to qualify as a concurrent review activity. The bill would also prohibit a plan or insurer from recouping an alleged overpayment on one claim by deducting or withholding the amount of the alleged overpayment from another claim relating to the same or a different enrollee or insured. Because a willful violation of the bill’s requirements relative to health care service plans would be a crime, the bill would impose a state-mandated local program.
The California Constitution requires the state to reimburse local agencies and school districts for certain costs mandated by the state. Statutory provisions establish procedures for making that reimbursement.
This bill would provide that no reimbursement is required by this act for a specified reason.


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